Spring 2017


Description of GWST courses offered Spring 2017

GWST 2113 Spring 2017

GWST 2113: Transnational Women's Studies
T/R 2:00-3:15 PM, CLB 317
Dr. Megan Burke

This course offers an introduction to the critical study of gender in a global world. We will learn how to think about gender as social and historical and as part of a larger constellation of histories of colonialism, economic globalization, and capitalist production and consumption. We will critically examine how women have been and are uniquely impacted by such histories and how our own lives and identities are enmeshed in and created by these histories.

GWST 2123 Campus Spring 2017

GWST 2123: Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies
MWF 10:30-11:20 AM, CLB 122
Dr. Jessica Glover

This course employs an interdisciplinary set of tools for analyzing women’s experiences and studies the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. This course does not only consider differences between women and men, but also explores differences among women. The readings and discussion will be designed to examine ideas about race, class, sexuality and other aspects of identity in addition to gender. Together we will discuss the relationships among these categories, and will analyze when and how such categories operate throughout American history and into contemporary society.

GWST 2123 Online Spring 2017

GWST 2123: Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies
WEB
Dr. Jessica Glover

Connect this spring ONLINE! This course employs an interdisciplinary set of tools for analyzing women’s experiences and studies the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. This course does not only consider differences between women and men, but also explores differences among women. The readings and discussion will be designed to examine ideas about race, class, sexuality and other aspects of identity in addition to gender. Together we will discuss the relationships among these categories, and will analyze when and how such categories operate throughout history.

Glover GWST 3450 Gender Ed Spring 2017

GWST 3450: Gender and Education
MWF 12:30-1:20 PM, CLB 309
Dr. Jessica Glover

This course explores intersections between gender and education from both historical and contemporary perspectives. It is designed to familiarize students with some of the primary issues, arguments, and evidence from academic research and popular culture concerning gender and education; examine how education participates in the construction of gendered identities, roles, expectations, experiences, and opportunities; as well as consider the fluctuating, historical, and contextually-specific nature of both “gender” and “education.” Foundational to these goals is exploring how the intersection of gender with significant identity categories such as race, sexuality, and class relates to educational practices. We will attempt to answer these and additional questions: How do students of all genders experience school? How is this experience shaped by factors such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and class? What hinders and what helps students’ personal development and academic achievement? What needs to change? How do social and cultural contexts affect the learning and development of students? How do these contexts shape the role and status of teachers? What can be learned from looking at a philosophy of education that takes gender into account?

GWST 3450 Body Politics Spring 2017

GWST 3450: Gender and Body Politics in Literature
MWF 1:30-2:20 PM, CLB 321
Dr. Jessica Glover

This reading-, writing-, and discussion-intensive course explores how the body remains one of the most significant cites for the enactment of power relations and is hence a vital site for their production, transformation, and critique. Taken as a whole, this course focuses on how writers tackle difficult and often taboo themes while portraying how the body often masks the particular racial, gendered, and sexualized practices that produce embodied difference. Among the topics we will examine are theories of gender as a performative masquerade; the relationship between patriarchy and biopower; the role of fashion, beauty, fitness, and public health discourses in mobilizing ‘body panic’ among women and enchanting them with ‘body projects’; and how women attempt to negotiate and resist heteronormative institutions, rituals, and roles.

GWST 4503 Spring 2017

GWST 4503/5990: Theorizing Men and Masculinities
Thursdays 4:30-7:10 PM
Dr. Megan Burke

This seminar is an interdisciplinary examination of the meaning and lived experience of masculinities. We will ask: What does it mean to be a man in the United States and elsewhere? Who gets to decide? Is masculinity bound to a particular body? Is it social? Imaginary? Violent? And lastly, what is the relationship between norms of masculinity, sexuality, race, and class? This course is open to graduate students and undergraduates with experience in gender and women’s studies.

Gender in America Spring 2017 Flyer

HIST 4553: Gender in America
MWF 10:30-11:20 AM
Dr. Karibo

This class examine the history of gender and sexuality in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Blending social, cultural, and political history, we'll place particular emphasis on the lived experiences of women and men from a wide range of backgrounds. One of our primary goals in this course will be to explore how definitions of 'femininity' and 'masculinity' have shifted over time. In order to do so, we'll focus on several key themes. These include race, ethnicity, and sexual politics; the long struggle for women's rights; shifting family and sexual patterns; representations of gender in art, media, advertising, and pop culture; gender and workplace politics; and our contemporary culture wars. Come prepared to analyze American history from new perspectives, and to challenge traditional ideas about what counts as 'important' history.

GWST 4990 Flyer

GWST 4990: LGBTQ Lives in the US
Tuesdays 12:30-1:20 PM
Dr. Megan Burke

This course seeks to shed light on the experiences of gender and sexual rebels, many of whom have come to call themselves lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, queer and transgendered people (LGBTQ), in the United States during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will consider definitions of gender and sexuality from LGBTQ perspectives and we will read first-person accounts, political manifestos, fiction and poetry, and historical accounts of LGBTQ lives to understand how LGBTQ individuals and communities struggle with culturally dominant definitions of their sexuality and fight the discrimination that faces them.

Dyke GC CIED 5723 Spring 2017

CIED 5723: Gender and Curriculum
Thursdays 7:20-10:00 PM, Willard 301
Dr. Erin Dyke

Course participants will: Develop an understanding of historical and contemporary perspectives on gender in the context of schooling and education in a variety of settings and levels. Study and develop their own pedagogy in relation to course readings and discussion. Learn through their/our own memories and lived experiences of gender and schooling.

Moder ENGL 6280 Spring 2017

ENGL 6280: Language and Gender
Tuesdays 4:30-7:10 PM, Morrill Hall 310
Dr. Carol Moder

We will discuss the theories and hypotheses underlying gender differences in language and examine the social construction of gender through language, focusing primarily on interactions in discourse. Specific areas of focus will be selected based on student specializations and interests. This class is open to anyone with an interest in gender studies; no prior linguistic study is required.

This course examines gender issues within the context and concerns of K-12 schooling as well as higher education within the United States. The readings and discussion will be designed to examine ideas about race, class, sexuality, and other aspects of identity in addition to gender. We will focus on the following themes: the history of gender discrimination within educational institutions; heterosexist, homophobic, and transphobic forms of bullying and violence; and the influences of gendered practices on students, teachers, classrooms, schools, and educational policy.